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Ben Kaplan
National Post
December 22, 2011

Unexpected Subway Living is an extraordinary piece at the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art by Jordan MacLachlan, a self-taught ceramic artist. The work, which features 223 terracotta figurines lost somewhere between Dante’s Inferno and the Dufferin Mall, took 15 months to complete. We asked MacLachlan why readers should brave the holiday traffic to check out her thought-provoking show.

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Murray Whyte
Toronto.com
December 17, 2011

Camilla Singh must like a challenge. The show she’s assembled for the Museum of Contemporary Art, now on display, carries with it the subtitle The Experience of Being Human, which, you might think, might be a little broader a category than the expanse of MOCCA’s walls, however generous, might be able to contain.

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Mariam Nader
Canadian Art
December 15, 2011

“Nothing is certain. Nothing is real.” This is the tag line for the final exhibition of 2011 at MOCCA, and the words vibrate throughout one’s tour of the show—not only in relation to the pretense of the exhibit, but because of one’s initial uncertainty regarding the connections between the works of art displayed. “Ineffable Plasticity,” curated by Camilla Singh, is a group show featuring the work of Mat Brown, Sherri Hay, Faith La Rocque, Jordan MacLachlan, Anders Oinonen and Susy Oliveira; it aims to examine the extent to which our physiological and psychological selves are manipulated by nature.

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Rachel Anne Farquharson
Artbarrage.com
December 04, 2011

“Nothing is certain. Nothing is real.” This is the tag line for the final exhibition of 2011 at MOCCA, and the words vibrate throughout one’s tour of the show—not only in relation to the pretense of the exhibit, but because of one’s initial uncertainty regarding the connections between the works of art displayed. “Ineffable Plasticity,” curated by Camilla Singh, is a group show featuring the work of Mat Brown, Sherri Hay, Faith La Rocque, Jordan MacLachlan, Anders Oinonen and Susy Oliveira; it aims to examine the extent to which our physiological and psychological selves are manipulated by nature.

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R.M. Vaughan
Globe and Mail
December 09, 2011

The Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art is arguably Toronto’s most contested, questioned and scrutinized visual-arts venue. The Power Plant runs a close second, but its waterfront, beyond-the-Gardiner location creates a psychological barrier between the venue and the citizenry, a barrier from which the space both benefits and suffers.

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Terence Dick
Akimbo
November 29, 2011

The new exhibition over at the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art is called Ineffable Plasticity and on first glance seemed to be something for the whole family (must have been the fish tanks that inspired me), but by the time you get to Mat Brown’s NSFW illustrated history of the beginnings of life, you might want to think twice about bringing the young ‘uns. There’s a confusing mash-up of things here, from various torments of humanity to Sherri Hay’s eye-popping wire sculpture and Faith La Rocque’s impressive goldfish/salt slab combo thingy. The latter artist is one who has routinely fried my synapses with her difficult to figure out installations. This one merits a return visit.

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Phil Anderson
Art Toronto
November 18, 2011

The exhibit ineffable plasticity, the experience of being human in compassed a variety of media from painting to installation. Matt Brown’s Circle of Willis (ink on matte board) detailed drawings were engaging and colourful. The 30 works were depicting a recounting of the history of the world, lined the east wall of the gallery.

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Anne Rucchetto
The Strand
November 29, 2011

18 Nov. served as the kick-off for the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art's current exhibition, Ineffable Plasticity: The experience of being human. As usual, the MOCCA's Opening Reception served multiple functions: part fashion show, part networking event, and part art crowd theatrics. Mainly though, it was a party — and MOCCA's parties are well worth attending. Offering up free admission, cheap booze, and Prague catering, the MOCCA consistently executes an event that provides all the right enticements for a crowd of hyper-trendy art enthusiasts.

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Andrea Carson
View on Canadian Art
November 23, 2011

I went to see the new show at the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art the other day. I discovered that since they have begun collaborating with the National Gallery of Canada, they no longer allow dogs inside, which was an unfortunate discovery for Hudson, who was with me.

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Christopher Jones
TO Live With Culture
November 21, 2011

Toronto’s Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art lit a rocket under curator Camilla Singh’s latest exhibition Friday night with a lively opening reception that gave the city’s art set plenty to chew on. Titled Ineffable Plasticity, the show features an all-Toronto slate of artists whose works consider “the experience of being human.”

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